Author Archive for: H.A.N.D.

Five Minutes With David Bowers & Paul Stanford

December 7, 2022
December 7, 2022


  David Bowers                      Paul Stanford 

To wrap up this year’s GenerationHAND mentorship program we interviewed one of our mentor-mentee pairings, David Bowers (Enterprise’s Vice President of the Mid-Atlantic Market and Senior Advisor of the Faith-Based Development Initiative) and Paul Stanford (Director of Grants Administration at the City of Baltimore Department of Housing & Community Development). During our conversation, Paul attributed a large part in obtaining his current role to David’s mentorship. David also highlighted the value of the insights he received from Paul, which led to interesting perspectives about approaches to life and work.

HAND: Paul, congratulations on your current role as Director of Grants Administration at the City of Baltimore DHCD! Can you tell us about your journey to this point and how your mentor, David Bowers, played a role in helping you to secure your current position?
PS: Thank you. My journey in the housing field started as an AmeriCorps Member with Habitat for Humanity of Michigan during college. The exposure I received seeing the positive impact Habitat for Humanity had on the community and families they helped become first-time homeowners gave me clear direction on the career field I wanted to pursue: housing. Specifically, affordable housing.

From there, I continued to expand my career and gained experience in different areas of housing, from housing counseling, foreclosure prevention, housing policy, program development, real estate development finance and managing large local rental housing and grant programs with different localities in Virginia, District of Columbia Government, and now the City of Baltimore.

My role as  is special because I play an important role in providing and managing millions of dollars in funding for housing and community development projects that will provide affordable housing and an economic impact on much-needed areas in Baltimore and manage a team of dedicated staff members. I now work in the city where I live and bought my first home. During the interview preparation stage for the position, I reached out to my mentor David Bowers for guidance and interview prep assistance. David previously served in a leadership role within Baltimore on its Affordable Housing Trust Fund Commission and would be a great asset in helping me prepare for my interview.

During our discussions, David provided me with expert-level training on one of the main grant programs I would be responsible for under the position and how to manage a team effectively. Having these discussions with David in preparation for the interview increased my confidence during the interview process, which eventually led to an offer and my acceptance as Director of Grants Administration.

HAND: David as the vice president and Mid-Atlantic market and senior advisor of the Faith-Based Development Initiative for Enterprise Community Partners, you lead a team that provides local developers access to financing and capacity building/technical assistance. Additionally, you are engaged with local coalitions advocating for increased resources for affordable housing and community development, among many other hats that you wear. Prior to joining Enterprise, you were a program manager for a single-family housing program at the AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust, a financial and programs advisor at the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, and worked in the office of U.S. Senator Barbara A. Mikulski. You have extensive experience in housing and community development, especially working in collaboration with public and private sector stakeholders in Baltimore and DC. Can you tell us how your mentors have assisted you along your journey? 
DB
Professional mentors have assisted me in my journey with several critical lessons. An early lesson was to be willing to stretch beyond my comfort zone to engage in an opportunity that would expand my horizons and provide me with strategic experience and exposure.  This is how I ended up doing appropriations work during my tenure working with former U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski.  I was hesitant to take advantage of the opportunity because I didn’t think of myself as “a numbers guy” but more of a policy guy.  One of my mentors in the office essentially told me to sit down, shut up, and listen.  She then schooled me on the power of the appropriations process and how valuable it would be for me to learn that process and be in those rooms.  It was some of the best advice I have ever received.  A second lesson I was taught by a mentor was to think three moves ahead.  At one point, I was about to leave the Senator’s office to take a job that would have doubled my pay.  My mentor told me it was a nice next step.  But has counseled me to think of how it would position me for the second and third move after that.  He and I would play chess at times.  He always beat me.  Part of the reason is that he could consistently think three to four moves ahead.  I decided to stay on board and get more experience doing appropriations work.  That was a better long-term professional move for me though it required a short-term sacrifice financially.  A third lesson a mentor taught me was to always understand what I am looking to get out of an employment experience because the employer/company always knows what they are looking to get out of the employee.  Whether it is the impact I want to have via my labor or what I want for my own professional growth and development – be clear on what is in it for me.  She helped me understand the importance this plays in setting the dynamic for interaction over issues including work responsibility, pay, time and title.

HAND: Paul, why do you believe your mentor-mentee relationship with David was fruitful? Specifically, what actions or mindset did you have as a mentee that helped lead to the success of your relationship?
PS
No knock to present or past mentors in the program, but I have the best mentor. I could not have asked for a better mentor. David took the GenerationHAND mentorship program seriously by ensuring we met bi-weekly, took notes, followed up on challenges I faced, and met the entire scheduled meeting times. I respected our mentor-mentee relationship by being available and on time for scheduled meetings and being prepared to have open conversations with David.

My mentor-mentee relationship with David began before the opportunity with Baltimore. With David being previously involved with the City of Baltimore and having expert-level knowledge on one of the grant programs, I would be responsible for making me believe our mentor-mentee relationship and my current position with the City of Baltimore was meant to be.

HAND: David, what is something you took away from this program that surprised you?
DB
A pleasant surprise for me in the experience as a GenerationHAND mentor was the insights I received from my mentee. During our conversations, there were interesting exchanges where I heard interesting perspectives about approaches to life and work from a different view. A variety of factors were likely at play – being from different generations and having different life experiences.  I was surprised at how our conversations really became comfortable two-way exchanges.

HAND: Paul, what would you say to mentors and mentees considering joining the GenerationHAND mentorship program? 
PS
For those considering joining the GenerationHAND mentorship program, I would say do it. Mentors and mentees can benefit from each other and potentially create a long-term mentor-mentee relationship. Communication and setting meeting expectations are key to a successful mentor-mentee relationship.

HAND: David, why did you want to be a mentor in this program, and what advice would you give to future GenerationHAND mentors? 
DB
I was willing to be a GenerationHAND mentor because I believe strongly in giving my time, talent, and treasure to benefit others. Part of that is from a sense of religious obligation. Part of it is from a sense of moral and cultural obligation. Others have poured into me, so I am compelled to pour into others. My hope is that my insights, questions and listening ear….that the time I spent with my mentor will play some part in helping him have an even more abundantly successful career.  I believe each generation should go further than the one before–building upon prior generations’ work and lessons.  For future GenerationHAND mentors, I would suggest to be available, be open, be honest and be you.

 

Five Minutes With John Hall

November 21, 2022
November 21, 2022

The HAND network is hard at work to address the growing housing affordability challenge across the Capital Region. Five Minutes With is a series highlighting these members and other stakeholders. This informal conversation delves into their recent projects, the affordable housing industry, and more. In this edition, we had a conversation with John Hall, Loudoun County’s new Director of Housing & Community Development. Check out our dialogue below to learn about his nearly 30-year career, what excites him about working in the DMV region again, and what he believes is a “secret sauce” to creating more equitable communities in our region!

HAND: Congratulations on your new role as Loudoun County’s new Director of Housing & Community Development! You have extensive experience in housing and community development – can you tell us about your journey to this point?
JH: Thank you very much!  I cannot believe I have been working nearly 30 years.  My journey has been so fulfilling.  I am grateful for having the privilege to work with so many great communities.  I started in the banking industry with commercial loan servicing and real estate loan administration in Dallas, Texas.  I pursued graduate studies in New York to focus on poverty alleviation activities such as workforce development and all other social welfare policies.  I never imagined integrating my banking experience.  In fact, in my first position after graduate school, my boss told me she hired me because of my banking experience, which is what I was trying to escape.  What I found over the years is that the banking experience provided me with an acute awareness of affirmative covenants, regulatory requirements, as well as commercial acquisition and development knowledge.

I leveraged this knowledge with workforce development to build neighborhood assets with a couple of community development corporations in Texas.  As a non-profit developer, I worked with elected officials, board members and communities to increase rooftops and generate economic activity.  My position in Lubbock, Texas afforded me the opportunity to work with everyone in order to effectuate components of John McKnight’s Asset Based Community Development model. 

From there, I initially arrived in the mid-Atlantic region working at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.  I endeavored to preserve affordable housing on a national level by working in the Mark-to-Market program with qualified non-profit organizations.  Wanting to be closer to the action, I became a field office director at HUD for the capital region and later for the Commonwealth of Virginia.  I left this role as I was appointed agency director for the District of Columbia’s Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD).  We achieved a lot at DHCD with affordable housing production, but what I am most proud of is the interdepartmental collaboration that institutionalized permanent supportive housing using the agency’s annual consolidated Notice of Funding Availability.  Since then, I have gained more experience at the local level overseeing entitlement grants and public housing agencies.

HAND: You were once the director of DC’s Housing and Community Development Department. What excites you about working in the DMV region again?
JH: I am elated to return to the DMV.  There is no place that possesses the intellectual capital this region has.  I am among friends in the business and look forward to re-activating networks to do great things together that benefit the residents of Loudoun County and the whole region.

HAND: As director of a newly established independent department, what excites you about your leadership role in this new department? Do you foresee any challenges? Are there key takeaways from your experience thus far that you are bringing into your new position?
JH: I am excited about the commitment of Loudoun County’s elected officials to provide attainable housing for everyone.  The County’s Unmet Housing Needs Strategic Plan (https://www.loudoun.gov/5278/Unmet-Housing-Needs-Strategic-Plan) has 143 key action items for us to create the opportunity for victory throughout the county.  Implementing public policy is my forte, and I am overjoyed to join the team.

Housing and community development is hard everywhere. Immediate challenges will be adjusting to rising mortgage interest rates and inflation.  To mitigate this, we must optimize resources with strategic collaborations to produce results.

I have always maintained a strong focus on compliance.  That may go back to my banking days.  We want to spend money wisely and appropriately to reduce any chance of grantors requiring repayment.  I also know that we must be results driven in a relatively short timeframe. Having shovel-ready projects in the development pipeline is key to delivering for county residents.

HAND: According to our Housing Indicator Tool (HIT), 45 percent of renters in Loudoun County spend more than 30% of their income on paying rent. How do you see your role in helping to navigate this issue?
JH: Households should not be rent-burdened.  My objective is to triage this challenge in various ways.  One way is to examine transit-oriented development opportunities.  Metro’s Silver Line recently commenced service in the county.  I see this milestone as an effective way for households living near stations to bundle their housing and transportation costs to improve their quality of life.  Enhancing programming such as the Housing Choice Voucher Program is another mechanism to reduce rent burden.  Participants can leverage the voucher with the Family Self-Sufficiency Program to increase wages whereby the differential in the rent increase is matched by the program and set aside in an escrow account.  Often times participants earn enough for down payments to purchase a home while then using the voucher share toward a mortgage payment.  I would like to see more emphasis placed in this regard to increase homeownership, generate wealth and stabilize families.

HAND: Do you believe there is a “secret sauce” to addressing housing affordability and creating more equitable communities in our region? If so, what do you think that is? What do you think is the largest obstacle?
JH: I believe the secret sauce is collaborating partnerships, where all parties bring resources for a specified period of time.  I do believe, however, that despite competing priorities, we all get done what we want to get done.  We just have to identify partners with shared vision and commitment in making our communities stronger.

HAND: What is your “why”? What keeps you motivated to continue your work in this space?
JH: My upbringing emphasized for me to take care of people around me and not just family but neighbors and community.  So, I am motivated to be the voice for people who are not in the room and who may not know how to use available resources to improve daily living.

HAND: What might you be doing if you weren’t working in this industry?
JH: I would be teaching financial literacy to increase the number of people who break cycles of poverty. 

Help Arlington County Track How Their Broadband Stacks Up!

September 21, 2022
September 21, 2022
 

Arlington County launched a broadband study as part of its effort to make sure residents have affordable, reliable access to high-speed internet. Arlington County will track how they stack up with their digital eCheckup assessment. Please share widely among your network and, if applicable, with tenants at your property:

What the Inflation Reduction Act Could Mean for DC Residents and Businesses

September 21, 2022
September 21, 2022
 
Last month, President Biden signed the largest investment in climate infrastructure in U.S. history, the “Inflation Reduction Act”(IRA). IRA details many provisions centered around clean energy, and its’ goal is to have long-lasting, positive impacts on residents, businesses, and the environment. The White House launched CleanEnergy.gov to provide guidance on rebates and tax credits offered by the IRA. Below is an overview of what the law’s rebates and tax credits could mean for DC residents and business owners summarized from DCSEU’s more detailed analysis of the IRA’s effects in DC.
 
 
What could this mean for DC residents?
 
  • The 30% tax credit extension will make going solar even more attractive.
  • The addition of battery storage technology can help residents increase their home’s and the electricity grid’s resilience.
  • The increased cap on credits for making energy efficiency improvements in your home will encourage more investments on an annual basis. This provision will also allow for credits on home energy audits and electrical panel upgrades for residents to move toward electrification.
  • High-Efficiency Electric Home Rebate Act could help residents make infrastructure upgrades required to decarbonize and electrify their homes and makes it more affordable for residents making 80% to 150% of AMI. 
  • Home Energy Performance-Based Whole House Rebates will allow the opportunity for low-income residents to make crucial efficiency updates to their homes with less out-of-pocket expenses.
  • Energy Credit for Solar and Wind in Low-Income Communities could further encourage the development of community solar in low – to moderate income communities.
 

What could this mean for DC businesses?

  • Grants for State-Based Home Energy Efficiency Contractor Training could help the contracting community gain necessary training and certifications to meet market needs that will be accelerated by the IRA rebates and tax credits.

 

 
 

The HAND Report | Our 2021-2022 Year In Review

August 29, 2022
August 29, 2022
 
HAND Members & Partners,
We invite you to look back at our recent highlights. Check out our 2021-2022 year in review below titled The HAND Report.” 
 
 
 

Five Minutes With Ayesha Hudson

August 9, 2022
August 9, 2022

The HAND network is hard at work to address the growing housing affordability challenge across the Capital Region. Five Minutes With is a series highlighting these members and other stakeholders. This informal conversation delves into their recent projects, the affordable housing industry, and more. In this edition, we had a conversation with Ayesha Hudson, the first loan recipient under  Equity in Action (EIA), HAND & Greystone’s debt and equity platform. Check out our dialogue below to learn about her 20+ year career, why she sought to get her project financed by the EIA, and what she believes is a “secret sauce” to creating more equitable communities in our region!

HAND: Congratulations on being the first loan recipient under HAND & Greystone’s Equity in Action program! We’ll get into that shortly, but first, can you tell us about your career journey up until this point?
AH: My career journey has been fulfilling! I am grateful to have achieved a 20+ year career in public service while simultaneously acquiring and managing investment properties. Both pursuits allowed me to impact others’ lives in very positively significant ways. When I consider my trajectory, it makes perfect sense that my path has led me to real estate development. I am motivated, through servant leadership, to create and preserve livable spaces in communities that are often overlooked. My varied career has given me a hands-on, inside look at my communities’ pain points while my empathy was groomed for action. I am looking forward to contributing more by way of quality, livable housing, and resident programming.  

HAND: Now, let’s talk about Equity in Action (EIA), a debt and equity platform designed to increase opportunities for black and brown real estate developers. Can you tell us why you sought to get your project financed by the EIA program?
AH: After engaging HAND’s membership and programming, I believed the EIA program was sincere.  Then when I met the lending team, I was convinced.  I began to see my loan application as a vehicle for positive change that would culminate with building improvements for my residents, growth of my business, and encouragement for other black and brown developers as they seek fair financing options.     

HAND: Tell us more about the project. What communities do you plan to serve, and what differentiates it from others in our region?
AH: This project is serving the beautiful Deanwood community, which has historically been underserved. I grew up within 3 miles of the building and would later respond to medical emergencies as a paramedic in this very neighborhood. While it can be a challenge to preserve housing in the lower socioeconomic areas of the District, our project fuses the business activity of real estate with a social responsibility to others. As an activated real estate development company, we are planning to add renewable resources and a more pleasing aesthetic to our block.  We are surrounded by neighborhood amenities, including public transportation and recreation making it a hidden jewel. We are looking forward to receiving some shine!  

HAND: How does it feel to be the first loan recipient under the Equity in Action program?
AH: I feel enthused, empowered, and better prepared to do this work!  My celebration, however, is tempered by the realization of the long-standing need for these kinds of lending initiatives. Once others follow, more black and brown developers can bring their full energy to the table so we may create better communities for our own communities. 

HAND: Many of us are familiar with the history of racism and its impacts on housing. Can you speak on how you approach your work in this space? How can developers of color in the real estate industry move the needle in a different direction?
AH: I approach my work in this space with a mix of empathy and realism. As I hone my development skills, I am guided by my spirituality and connectedness to the black community. Since my first investment in 1999, I have had an affinity for properties that, on first look, appear blighted. Knowing that our community yields so many hidden jewels, I am conscious of supporting it with the best intentions; financial reward has followed.  Moving any needle requires coordination and attentiveness.  As more developers of color align our skills, resources, and grit with one another, we will move the needle one project at a time. Relationship building and mentorship are integral to its success.      

HAND: Do you believe there is a “secret sauce” to addressing housing affordability and creating more equitable communities in our region? If so, what do you think that is? What do you think is the largest obstacle? –
AH: I believe the lack of housing affordability will need to be systematically dismantled through housing legislation. The laws that govern financing, tax implications, and subsidies present layers of restriction already germane in undervalued communities.  To me, the largest obstacle is fear of change.  The perceived social norms of poor people are woven into real estate development. As political decision-makers revamp laws to create more inclusivity, the housing landscape will inevitably change. 

HAND: What is your “why”? What keeps you motivated to continue your work in this space?
AH: I feel compelled to share my resources and influence in black and brown communities.  I enjoy working with people and being a part of a solution.  Being a housing provider allows me to take part in both callings. My grandfathers were involved in various real estate endeavors to include owning and operating a well-shopped convenience store in West Philly to running a farm in Waldorf, Maryland.  They imparted the importance of building a legacy, having self-reliance, and always sharing.  This opportunity to change my life and those around me is what keeps me motivated. 

HAND: If you weren’t working in this industry, what might you be doing?
AH: In my dreamt-up career, I’d be a part-time civil rights trial attorney who travels the world interviewing and writing about interesting people. 

Federal and Local Government Visit Spring Flats To Highlight Their Recent Investment in Affordable Housing

July 7, 2022
July 7, 2022



Pictured above from left to right: DC Mayor Muriel Bowser and HUD Secretary Marcia Fudge.
Photo Credit: ABC 7 News

HUD Secretary Fudge and DC Mayor Bowser visited Victory Housing’s Spring Flats development in DC to highlight actions they’re taking to increase the housing supply and lower housing costs. HUD’s Our Way Home is a national initiative that uplifts housing supply successes in local communities and connects cities, states, counties, Tribal communities, and U.S. Territories to the tools and resources needed to help preserve and produce affordable housing in their area. Our Way Home is an effort to build on the Biden-Harris Administration’s actions to address communities’ housing supply needs in an equitable, inclusive, and sustainable fashion. Mayor Bowser was also in attendance to announce the rolled out of a $1.4 billion investment in the DC’s Housing Production Trust Fund and the affordable housing toolkit in an effort to reach 36,000 new homes by 2025, including at least 12,000 affordable homes.

Spring Flats was the perfect setting for the announcements because of its’ affordable housing for seniors and families, homeownership opportunities and representation of the all-hands-on-deck approach that is needed for solving for the affordable housing crisis. Spring Flats is a combined redevelopment and new construction project completed in 2022 that was undertaken by a development team led by Victory Housing in partnership with Bank of America CDC and Brinshore Development. The new Spring Flats community consists of three different components: The Appleton, The Robeson, and The Rows at Spring Flats. A full description and images of the Spring Flats community can be found here.

Want to dig deeper? The articles below offer further details about HUD Secretary Fudge and DC Mayor Bowser’s recent investments in affordable housing.

Funding to Support Community-Centered BIPOC-Led Nonprofits’ Ability to Extend Services and Reach

July 6, 2022
July 6, 2022

BIPOC-led nonprofit organizations have limited access to equity building tools and resources. In partnership with Capital One, Prosperity Now is extending the Building High Impact Nonprofits of Color into the DMV area. This fund will grant $1.1 million to Prosperity Now, a national racial and economic justice nonprofit based in Washington, DC.  Prosperity Now will put the funds to immediate use to spark economic advancement and impact through empowering organizations that reflect the communities they serve. Prosperity Now will work with several organizations across the metropolitan DMV to provide leadership and capacity-building opportunities to advance their work. HAND is pleased to be participating in the cohort with the following organizations: 

  • Collegiate Directions 
  • Latino Economic Development Center 
  • LIFT-DC
  • Marshall Heights Community Development  
  • My Sisters’ Place 
  • Safe Sisters Circle 

Check out the official press release here.

Five Minutes With Maia Shanklin Roberts

April 10, 2022
April 10, 2022

The HAND network is hard at work to address the growing housing affordability challenge across the Capital Region. Five Minutes With is a series highlighting these members and other stakeholders. This informal conversation delves into their recent projects, the affordable housing industry, and more.  In this edition, we had a conversation with Maia Shanklin Roberts the Vice President
of Real Estate Development for Preservation of Affordable Housing
. Check out our dialogue below to learn more about the Barry Farms project, her work experience, and her words of wisdom for the next generation of leaders of color!

HAND: Congratulations on your new role at Preservation of Affordable Housing! Are there key takeaways from your experience thus far that you are bringing into your new position? 
MSR: Key takeaways: Engagement of community is essential in a successful affordable housing project. In my role, I am responsible for taking inventory of all of the various stakeholders on the project and discerning how best to utilize their skills/resources for the project. And most importantly, I have to be thoughtful in how to engage marginalized voices in the process because it is these stakeholders that are most impacted by my decisions.

HAND: You have extensive experience in a wide range of complex affordable housing development and real estate transactions – can you tell us about your journey to this point
MSR: I was an affordable housing attorney from 2017 to 2021. When going to law school, I knew that I wanted to do work that could create systemic change in low-income and urban communities. It was the sole purpose of going to law school. I am from DC, where I learned firsthand the realities of the impact divestment had on black and brown communities. Then after graduating college, I came back to DC to work for the Peaceoholics, where I worked with youth in gangs and crews and learned that unless we bring real resources to their communities – there would be no way we could truly curb the violence and other issues that plague our community. That lead me to law… and my desire to work to provide economic resources to my community. I loved it until I realized that I could do more. I could be that designer and bring my skills and talents, and perspective as a black woman from the community into my work. 

HAND: What excites you about your new role? Do you foresee any challenges? 
MSR: Working on affordable housing projects in DC excites me the most. Barry Farm is a major redevelopment, and it is my job to work with my team to imagine and implement a plan that could transform the lives of former residents and the DC natives. That’s huge! Of course, there will be challenges. On top of the challenge of developing a multi-phase project – infrastructure and vertical buildings… we also must address issues like gentrification, protecting former residents’ right to return, systemic poverty, and equity all within the project. 

HAND: Do you believe there is a “secret sauce” to addressing housing affordability and creating more equitable communities in our region? If so, what do you think that is? What do you think is the largest obstacle?
MSR: Not necessarily secret sauce… I believe you just have to operate with the assumption that your purpose as a developer of affordable housing community is to be the voice for the underserved and marginalized. Therefore, it is your job to increase opportunity for diverse and equitable participation at all levels in the project, and to ensure that you deliver a project with resources and amenities that provide equitable outcomes for the community served. I think the largest obstacle is that what’s “market” is not equitable. And so you constantly have to push this agenda with all stakeholders from your financing partners, to contractors, to national commercial tenants. In all ways, you have to ask on every call/with every decision, what more can be done to be inclusive and maximize opportunity and benefit for those who are not sitting at this table because of systemic racism and marginalization.

HAND: What is your “why”? What keeps you motivated to continue your work in this space?
MSR: There are not many people in leadership that look like me, and I want to change that. Our work directly affects black and brown communities. We must have more people of color in leadership and working on these transactions to ensure that they are best served.

HAND: Keeping in mind the history of racism and its impacts on housing, how can leaders of color or, more specifically, women leaders of color in the real estate industry move the needle in a different direction?
MSR: Your voice is needed. Don’t allow anyone to take that away from you. I think the most significant barrier is for the myriad of reasons we aren’t seen… I make it my business to be seen. I am passionate about my work and I don’t have any fear of speaking up and being the only one in the room if I have to be.
 

HAND: If you weren’t working in this industry, what might you be doing?
MSR: I would probably be doing similar work… lol, and traveling to warm and sunny destinations with my family.

Need Support With BEPS Compliance?

April 10, 2022
April 10, 2022

 


With only one year left until the first major DC’s Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS) deadline, the Building Innovation Hub recently released a new suite of tools to support you with BEPS compliance! HAND is proud to share the Building Innovation Hub’s resources below, which will help you navigate the regulations and enable easier building upgrades.

  • BEPS Compliance Pathway Wizard. This will help you understand which BEPS Compliance Pathway is most appropriate for you and your building.
  • BEPS Compliance Pathway Timelines. This will inform you about interim deadlines and major milestones associated with each BEPS Compliance Pathway.
  • Energy Audit Scopes of Work. Building Innovation Hub offers one version specific to the requirements outlined in the Prescriptive Pathway and another to help you choose a BEPS Compliance Pathway.
  • Find-A-Vendor Portal. This simple notification system will share project opportunities with local service providers and contractors via an email distribution list. The portal is now open and ready for building owners and representatives to submit their BEPS or energy-related projects to Building Innovation Hub’s list of vendors.
  • Request a BEPS Presentation. The Building Innovation Hub is in the process of training local experts in all the details of the BEPS regulations. If you’re interested in holding a presentation at your office or building about BEPS, please request one.
  • Contact the Building Innovation Hub. If you have any questions or need additional support, please contact the Building Innovation Hub directly at info@buildinginnovationhub.org.